Validating smart objective employee performance input

What the Experts Say For many employees, a face-to-face performance review is the most stressful work conversation they’ll have all year. “What a performance appraisal requires is for one person to stand in judgment of another.

Validating smart objective employee performance input

Say some positive things about what the employee is good at, then some unpleasant things about what he’s not […] " It’s performance review season, and you know the drill.

Say some positive things about what the employee is good at, then some unpleasant things about what he’s not good at, and end — wearing your most solicitous grin — with some more strokes of his ego.

“Oftentimes managers are evaluating performance without necessarily knowing what that person’s career aspirations are. Lay the groundwork About two weeks before the face-to-face review, ask your employee to jot down a few things he’s done over the last year that he’s proud of.

This will both help refresh your memory, and “will put a positive focus on an event that is so often seen as negative,” says Grote.

It’s performance review season, and you know the drill.

Drag each of your direct reports into a conference room for a one-on-one, hand them an official-looking document, and then start in with the same, tired conversation.

“Let them have that on their own time, and give them a chance to think about it.” Then with a calmer, cooler head, the employee can prepare for a rational and constructive business conversation.

Set a tone Too often the face-to-face conversation takes the form of a “feedback sandwich:” compliments, criticism, more niceties.

“But if you must, do not save the salary information for the end of the conversation,” says Grote, “otherwise there’ll be an invisible parrot above the employees’ head squawking: how much?

throughout the entire discussion.” Rank is another place for potential bruised feelings.

You must be clear from the outset how you’ll evaluate your employees.

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