Without a paddle dating

The term "paddleboarding" is sometimes incorrectly used to refer to stand up paddle surfing.

Historian and writer Steve West claimed that the contemporary notion of stand up paddle boarding, if attributed to the Waikiki Beach Boys of Oahu during the 1960s, considers that outrigger canoeing should be recognised as the direct link between the idea of standing on a board and propelling it with a canoe paddle, since the individual SUP skills (board riding and paddling) already existed, used by people who had traditionally grown up learning them.

The first magazine devoted to the sport, Standup Journal, was founded in June 2007.

In 2007 the concept of paddle boarding on flat-water began to take serious shape and a year later the first touring board manufacturer, Tahoe SUP, released the "Woody" and the "Zephyr" as a specifically designed, flat-water paddling boards.

Stand up paddlers wear a variety of wet suits and other clothing, depending on water and air temperature since most of their time is spent standing on the board.

A related, traditional sport, paddleboarding, is done kneeling on a board and paddling with the hands, similar to a butterfly swimming stroke.

Standup paddleboarding (SUP), the act of propelling oneself on a floating platform with the help of a paddle or pole, traces back to thousands of years ago and across many continents, but its current form and popularity originated in Hawaii in the 1900s. 3,000 years ago) and its iterations span over various regions such as Peru, Israel, Italy, China, and beyond.

Records of earlier forms of SUP have been found as early as 1,000 B. By contrast, the modern form of stand up paddle boarding, where a surfboard-like vessel is used, has a much clearer heritage, dating back to the 1900s and emerging from a collection of loosely related activities by a few very specific characters, such as Duke Kahanamoku and Dave Kalama.

Once it reached California in the early 2000s, stand up paddling formed four epicenters, each with its own fountainhead: Rick Thomas (San Diego), Ron House (Dana Point/San Clemente), Laird Hamilton (Malibu) and Bob Pearson (Santa Cruz).

From there, the sport gained exponential popularity and California served as the catalyst for worldwide adoption.

The lifeguards used a paddle to propel them through the water quickly to rescue swimmers.

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